Cracow, Poland

Local Government Administration

Administracja samorządowa

Language: Polish Studies in Polish
Subject area: economy and administration
University website: www.up.krakow.pl/en
Government
A government is the system or group of people governing an organized community, often a state.
Local
Local usually refers to something nearby, or in the immediate area.
Local Government
A local government is a form of public administration which, in a majority of contexts, exists as the lowest tier of administration within a given state. The term is used to contrast with offices at state level, which are referred to as the central government, national government, or (where appropriate) federal government and also to supranational government which deals with governing institutions between states. Local governments generally act within powers delegated to them by legislation or directives of the higher level of government. In federal states, local government generally comprises the third (or sometimes fourth) tier of government, whereas in unitary states, local government usually occupies the second or third tier of government, often with greater powers than higher-level administrative divisions.
Government
The free system of government we have established is so congenial with reason, with common sense, and with a universal feeling, that it must produce approbation and a desire of imitation, as avenues may be found for truth to the knowledge of nations.
James Madison, letter to Pierre E. Duponceau, January 23, 1826. James Madison papers, Library of Congress. These words are inscribed in the Madison Memorial Hall, Library of Congress James Madison Memorial Building.
Government
Say to the seceded States—Wayward sisters, depart in peace!
Winfield Scott, letter to W. H. Seward (March 3, 1861)
Government
And the first thing I would do in my government, I would have nobody to control me, I would be absolute; and who but I: now, he that is absolute, can do what he likes; he that can do what he likes, can take his pleasure; he that can take his pleasure, can be content; and he that can be content, has no more to desire; so the matter's over.
Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote (1605-15), Part I, Book IV, Chapter XXIII
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